Friday, June 26, 2015

Translink Police lying about Stats ?

March 3, 2013. If a public company gave one set of sales numbers to its board of directors, another to its shareholders, and a third to its auditors the chit would hit the fan with gusto."Incredibly, that’s precisely what has happened with the Transit Police.

In late February, the union and police brass did a local media tour, trying to drum up support for their beleaguered force. The next week, they released crime statistics showing what a bang-up job they’re doing. Or not.
Comparing their 2010 crime statistics in the new report, released March 4, and last spring’s Vancouver Police Department (VPD) operational review, has revealed a significant problem – they don’t match.

The VPD review reports Transit Police investigated 592 violent crimes in 2010. The new report says 615 – an addition of 4 per cent. The VPD review claims Transit Police dealt with 1,065 property crimes in 2010. The new report says 1,229 – an addition of 15 per cent. And the VPD review says Transit Police dealt with 296 police obstruction issues in 2010. The new report says 359 – an addition of 21 per cent.

This statistical sweetening continues throughout several categories: 12 per cent more disturbances, 15 per cent more weapons possessions, 15 per cent more drug cases, 44 per cent more emergency health or fire assists and 29 per cent more disturbed persons. Astonishingly, a third set of 2010 crime numbers – with even fewer reported incidents than the VPD review stats – was given to the Transit Police Board in March 2011.
The combined violent and property crime rate on the transit system decreased by 6.8 per cent from 2008 to 2010. Sounds good, until you consider that the crime rate across the Lower Mainland as a whole decreased by 13.9 per cent. Over five years, the Transit Police is expected to grow 25 per cent.

No wonder the Transit Police were a 2013 finalist for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation’s (CTF) signature Teddy Waste awards, which recognize the governments, public office holders, government employees, departments or agencies that most exemplify runaway government waste."



http://beaconnews.ca/blog/2013/03/did-transit-police-sweeten-their-stats/

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Ancient Gold Coins

Example of the most successful coin in history; an antique fine gold ducat or Zecchino, minted under the 82nd Doge of Venice, Lorenzo Priuli. Struck 1556 - 1559 in Venice, Italy.

The gold ducats of Venice were first struck in 1284. Their very high gold content (99.40%) made the coins extremely desirable and they are considered to be the earliest examples of a globally accepted currency. Ducats continued to be struck for over 500 years - longer than any other coin issue in history. $1,250.00
An ancient Indian gold Maiores Domus dinar from the Kushan Empire, struck under Emperor Vasudeva II circa 270 - 310 A.D.

The obverse with Vasudeva II, nimbate, standing left, sacrificing over altar and holding filleted scepter; in left field, filleted trident. The reverse with the goddess Ardoxsho, nimbate, seated facing on throne, holding diadem and cornucopia. $850.00
An ancient Greek hekte from Cyzicus, Mysia, struck circa 500 - 450 B.C. The obverse with naked youth kneeling right, hair bound by taenia with frontal projection, holding knife and tunny fish (emblem of Cyzicus). The reverse with quadripartite incuse square punch. Kyzikos was a wealthy ancient town located between the Aegean and the Black Sea, its advantageous position made it a major center for commerce and trade. $2,250.00
Ancient Celtic gold stater struck by the Chief of the Corieltauvi tribe, Volisios Dumnocoveros. Dating to the Late Iron Age circa 20 - 35 A.D.

The obverse with a vertical wreath made up of square leaves running in opposite directions from the centre of the coin. Across this in two lines is the legend: VOLISIOS The reverse with disjointed Celtic horse, galloping left. $3,250.00
An ancient Byzantine gold solidus of Emperor Basiliscus, (Flavius Basiliscus Augustus.) Struck January 475 - August 476 A.D. at the Constantinople mint. The obverse with a superb portrait of Basiliscus carrying a spear which rests over his shoulder and holding an oval shield, decorated with a horseman spearing a fallen enemy. The legend reading:

D[ominvs] N[oster] BASILICVS P[ater] P[atriae] AVG[vstvs]
"Our Lord Basiliscus, Father of the People, Augustus"

The reverse with the goddess, Victory standing left holding a long, jewelled cross and wearing loose drapery. $7,000.00


Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Jewels of HRH Queen Elizabeth II

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the constitutional monarch of sixteen realms of the 53-member Commonwealth of Nations. She is also the head of the Commonwealth, and the Supreme Governor of the Church of England.

Upon her accession on February 6 1952, Elizabeth became head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon. Her coronation the following year was the first to be televised.

H.M. Queen Elizabeth II upon her Coronation in 1953. She holds the Sovereign's Orb, the Sceptre with the Cross and wears the Imperial State Crown.
The Flower Basket Brooch

A present to Princess Elizabeth from King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to mark the birth of her first child and their first grandchild, Prince Charles on 14 November 1948. It is reported to be her favorite.
Pink and blue sapphire, diamond and ruby brooch made by Cartier. Given to Princess Elizabeth by her parents King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1945.

King George VI Sapphire and Diamond Suite. Purchased by King George VI from Carrington & Co and given to Princess Elizabeth as a wedding present in 1947.

The necklace originally consisted of eighteen emerald-cut sapphires in diamond clusters. In 1952 it was shortened by four stones, the largest of which was converted into a pendant to the necklace in 1959.
The emerald and diamond encrusted Godman Necklace was a gift by the two elderly Godman sisters to her majesty the Queen.

The two sisters who remained unmarried and were spinsters inherited the necklace from their father Frederick Du Cann, a British naturalist, who purchased the necklace whilst on a holiday in Bavaria in the 1890s
Aquamarine Clips.

An eighteenth birthday present to Princess Elizabeth from her parents King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in 1944. The clips are a personal favorite and seen frequently on the queen.
Williamson diamond broach. The central diamond of 23.6 carats is one of the finest pinks known. It was excavated from a mine in Tanganyika (Tanzania) belonging to the Canadian geologist Dr John Williamson, who gave it as a wedding present to Princess Elizabeth in 1947.
Brazilian Aquamarine Suite. The earrings and matching necklace were a Coronation gift to The Queen from the President and People of Brazil in 1953. A bracelet and matching brooch were presented to The Queen by the Brazilian Government in 1958 as a matching addition to the original gift.

On June 20, 2014, Her Majesty wore one-of-a-kind brooch designed by Canadian jeweller, Hillberg & Berk to the Royal Ascot racecourse. The contemporary floral design is set in 18K white gold and features Madagascar tourmaline, a white freshwater pearl and 300 diamonds.

The brooch was presented to The Queen in October 2013 and first worn while attending Sunday service on February 2, 2014.
Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten proposed to Princess Elizabeth with a 3 carat diamond solitaire ring flanked on each side by 5 smaller diamonds, set in platinum. The diamonds were taken from a tiara owned by Philip’s mother, Princess Alice.
The Coronation Necklace and diamond drop earrings were worn at the coronations of Queen Alexandra in 1901, Queen Mary in 1911, Queen Elizabeth in 1937 and Her Majesty The Queen in 1953. The earrings were made by R. & S. Garrard & Co. in 1858 for Queen Victoria.
The George IV State Diadem. Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls.
The Queen wears it to and from each State Opening of Parliament and for official portraits. That combination has made it one of the most recognizable symbols of her reign; it adorns stamps, money, and more official images around the world.
The Girls of Great Britain & Ireland Tiara. The tiara was one of the future Queen Mary’s wedding presents in 1893. A committee of "Girls of Great Britain & Ireland" chaired by Lady Eve Greville raised over £5,000 and purchased the tiara from Garrard.

The tiara seems to be the Queen's favorite - she's said to call it "Granny's tiara"

Cullinan I (530.2 carats) and Cullinan II (317.4 carats)

Cullinan III and Cullinan IV

Cullinan V

Cullinan VI and Cullinan VIII


See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/10/the-cullinan-diamond.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/05/jewels-of-queen-victoria.html
See -----> http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/02/the-crown-jewels.html
See ----->http://pennystockjournal.blogspot.ca/2014/04/the-french-crown-jewels.html